My Story Part III: There’s no such thing as a free lunch

It was as though I were floating in space as soon as the word, “Cancer,” filtered through my ear drum. All senses suspend. Appendages go numb. Lips feel fuzzy. Time stops.

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My Story Part II: Like sands through the hourglass, those are the grains of our lives

It isn’t the mountain ahead that wears you out; it’s the grain of sand in your shoe.

– Robert W. Service

My Rock and I had just enough time to eat our sandwiches in the waiting area when we were introduced to Michele Speer, the Breast Center Nurse Navigator at Stamford Hospsital and brought to her office. The room was bedecked with pink ribbons, pink teddy bears, and all things pink. We sat on her sofa and she brought up a screen with what looked like the outline of a breast and then a bunch of little white spots forming a crescent. Each dot looked like a grain of salt. They were somewhat sporadic, but clearly there. Michelle explained that they were likely just calcifications, is where calcium salts form and build into hardened grains, and nothing. However, because they are they and the hospital wanted to rule them out, they wanted to have me come in for a biopsy.

I was told to stop taking any and all supplements I’d been taking as part of the D’Adamo Shift plan, as some herbal remedies prevent blood from clotting, and since this is an invasive procedure, it would be best to refrain. The biopsy was scheduled for the following week. And timing stunk. It was just a day or two before a day-long drive up to Maine for a mountain-bike race weekend.

Being the control freak that I am, I asked Michelle to describe the procedure in explicit detail. When she got to the part that my breast would be dropped through a hole in the table with me facing down, and I’d have absolutely no visibility to what was going on, I slammed on the brakes.

“No way, Michelle. No way. That’s not going to happen.”

“What do you mean? You don’t want to see this.”

“The hell I don’t.”

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